Wednesday, November 19, 2008

The Transporters DVD is (finally) being released in the USA and Canada

I received this email yesterday. Alex has been using The Transporters for 1.5 years now, and on top of being fun, it has taught him about emotions.



Hello from The Transporters team.

(Thank you for previously signing up for this occasional
newsletter. To
unsubscribe, see below)

We're delighted to tell you that, after more than three
years work, the North
American English version of
The
Transporters DVD Pack will be available from
Tuesday 2nd December at
www.thetransporters.com.

The Transporters is a fun animation series designed
to help children with autism
and Asperger's Syndrome
to understand and recognize emotions. The North
American
version has local accents and vocabulary
and is designed for use inthe USA and
Canada on
a regular TV.


The versions that have been distributed in the UK
and Australia have been very
popular and we've
had wonderful messages from parents, as well as
from
healthcare and education professionals. You
can see some of these, together with
stories from
the press at
www.thetransporters.com/say.html

Please do forward this email to friends or colleagues
whom you feel would be
interested or may benefit
from the DVD. (They can sign up for their own
occasional newsletter, with a brief alert on launch
day, at
www.thetransporters.com/newsletter.html).

Below, you'll find a note especially for parents from
Prof. Simon Baron-Cohen,
Director of the Autism
Research Center at Cambridge University. We plan
to
include short research insights into various
aspects of autism and Asperger's
Syndrome in
future editions of this occasional newsletter.


Best wishes from London.

Claire, Jonathan, Simon and Nick at Changing
Media Development.



______________________________________________________________

From Prof. Simon Baron-Cohen:

"As a parent of a child with autism or Asperger's
Syndrome you will have
noticed that your child spends
less time looking at your face - and
particularly your
eyes - compared to typically developing children of the

same age. This means children on the autistic
spectrum are missing out on
key opportunities to learn
about emotions from people's faces as they are

growing up. The Transporters has been developed as
a powerful way to get
children on the autistic
spectrum to start looking at faces - even without

realizing that's what they are doing.

The Transporters are animated vehicles. Your child
is likely to enjoy the
wheels going round and round,
the vehicles moving along tracks, and the
mechanical
devices that are transparent in how they work. Once
your child's
attention is hooked, they will be more
open to taking in information about
faces and
emotions at the same time.


In my experience, previous attempts to try to get
children on the autistic
spectrum to look at faces have
often required rewarding the child in very
artificial
ways (such as giving them raisins or star charts).
What's neat
about The Transporters is that since the
vehicles are intrinsically
appealing, there's no need for
an external reward. Your child's attention
will probably
be fully focused on the screen without needing to be
pushed to
watch.

I'm excited about the results from our trial of The
Transporters,
showing clearly that children on the
autistic spectrum are learning about
emotions.

Please help by forwarding this email to relatives,
friends or colleagues
who might be interested. If you
have been forwarded this email and would
like to sign
up to receive your own copy of this occasional newsletter

please visit www.thetransporters.com/newsletter.html

Thanks, Simon."

Prof. Simon Baron-Cohen PhD
Director, Autism Research Center,
Cambridge University, UK

2 comments:

Perky Skeptic said...

OMG, my dad just sent me an email asking if we wanted this for B! :) :) Thanks for the recommendation!

The Glasers said...

I have been curious about The Transporters DVD, too. I know they can help children identify emotions and I think that is terrific. Has Alex generalized what he has learned? We are teaching our 19yo autie about emotions through RDI, so we are going about it in a non-technological way.